Top 5 UK Industries Developing Hearing Problems

Many of the working class don’t think about their health, especially their hearing when thinking about their job. There are, however, some clear links to certain health problems and job occupations, some of which may surprise you.

According to the Office of National Statistics, it was estimated that 260,472 people in the UK suffered from some type of Hearing Problem in 2017. It’s very alarming how little people know about the risks associated with their job, and the complications it can have on their health later down the line.

5.) Someone working within skilled trades may be at higher risk of having troubles with their hearing, some studies suggest. Taking all main occupations into account, it is estimated that Skilled Trades make up for 10.28% of the total number of workers within the UK suffering from hearing difficulties. Those working in construction, including bricklayers, joiners, and welders, are prone to persistent and loud noises from machines and equipment within the workplace. This can result in sensorineural hearing loss, having the potential to cause hearing problems later in life.

4.) The next occupation most likely to develop a hearing problem is those within the Educational industry. According to a recent NEU survey, 74% of school support staff in the UK confirmed that they work additional uncontracted hours. These added pressures are known to lead to stress and anxiety, which both are known to have a profound impact on one’s hearing. For this reason, added pressures within this field are bound to correlate with why it is fourth on this list.

3.) Managers and Senior officials are job occupations that are linked with hearing problems. Similarly, to those working in the educational industry, the added stress in the workplace can take its toll on one’s hearing over a prolonged period. Although this may not be due to working extra hours, a reason for this may be the added responsibilities that are intrinsic to their job role. It is estimated that 14.23% of UK workers with hearing difficulties link back to this industry.

2.) From our findings, those within the Associate, Professional and Technical industry are estimated to make up for 15.42% of all UK workers suffering from some type of hearing problem. Engineers and technicians are known to work within a loud environment with loud machinery consistently in use throughout the working day. Although ear protection is recommended when working on machines, prolonged exposure to loud noises throughout the day is bound to have consequences for those working within this field.

1.) The industry affected the most is one that many would not initially suspect. Those within professional occupations are estimated to make up for 16.62% of all workers in the UK suffering from hearing issues. Although this is surprising, there is a valid explanation as to why this is so high. Job roles in this category include doctors and lawyers. Working within this type of environment is often intense and puts high amounts of pressure on those workers, due to the high stakes involved within their day-to-day roles. With stress and anxiety corresponding with hearing problems, especially long-term, it makes a lot of sense as to why this was the industry ranking at number one in terms of workers with hearing issues.

Hearing loss is one of the world’s most common health problems and unfortunately it is also one of the most ignored problems too. This is very unfortunate as hearing loss and its psychological effects are highly treatable. Hearing tests are often free and come with worthwhile advice on looking after your ears. It’s highly recommended to book in for a consultation with an Audiologist such as Otec Hearing if you have any concerns on your hearing.

Receiver in the Canal Hearing Aids

his blog continues our series on us covering the different types of hearing aids. We’ve covered many of the popular options, including some such as ‘Invisible in the Ear Canal’ (IIC), ‘Completely in the Canal’ (CIC), and ‘In the Canal’ (ITC) hearing aids. Within this article, we reference these hearing aids and compare them against one another. If you haven’t already, we recommend you read through our blogs on these before continuing this one.

We will be covering ‘Receiver in the Canal’ (RIC) hearing aids in this article and will be putting it up against some other popular choices.

RIC hearing aids sit behind the ear, with the receiver being located inside the ear canal. This is ideal positioning as sounds can travel directly into the ear via an invisible electrical receiver wire.

What’s great about RIC hearing aids is that they can house two different types of batteries. These are available in a size 10 (4-7 day) battery life, size 312 (7-10 day) battery life, with some RIC hearing aids available in a rechargeable option. They are also available at any technology level.

There are some clear advantages to choosing a RIC aid, one of these being that different power receivers can be fitted depending on the severity of hearing loss. This can make the hearing aid future-proof, as the power levels can be changed if the user’s hearing deteriorates. A more natural rich sound quality is also made available from these aids, as they do not completely occlude the ear canal. The different domes available can make the hearing aid fit severe or profound losses and any size ear canal.

These hearing aids can be connected to your smartphone, so you can have full control over them in any environment. Furthermore, the aids are very light in weight making the user feel very comfortable. And to top it all off, the increased microphones make listening to speech in the background is easier, which is fantastic for when the user is in public places.

RIC hearing aids may sound like a fantastic choice, although there is a catch to them. Poor dexterity or visual problems can make the insertion and removal of the aid difficult. The aid will also require regular cleaning, as any blockage in the microphone port or receiver could potentially block sounds coming out of the aid. On top of this, when using a landline phone with this aid, the telephone receiver has to be held in an unnatural position. This is not ideal for those who use telephones frequently within their daily lives of jobs.

Does a Receiver in the Canal hearing aid sound like a practical option for you? At Otec Hearing, we select and recommend hearing aids based on your requirements. Give us a call to book your free hearing test on 01522 305400.

In the Ear Hearing Aids

In this blog, we are resuming our series on the different types of hearing aids. We’ve covered many of the popular options, including some such as ‘Invisible in the Ear Canal’ (IIC), ‘Completely in the Canal’ (CIC), and ‘In the Canal’ (ITC) hearing aids. Within this article, we reference these hearing aids and compare them against one another. If you haven’t already, we recommend you read through our blogs on these before continuing this one.

We will be covering ‘In the Ear’ (ITE) hearing aids in this instalment and highlighting the pros and cons of this particular type of aid.

ITE hearing aids are the largest type of custom-made aid and cover the full external ear. Much like IIC, CIC, and ITC hearing aids, ear impressions are required for this type to fit the ear of the user. ITE aids use a size 13 battery, typically the lifespan of this battery can last up to 14 days.

What’s great about an ITE aid is that it can cover profound hearing losses, making these the most powerful custom-made aid available. They are also best suited for someone who has dexterity issues as the insertion and removal is extremely easy. The dual microphones of the In the Ear hearing aid can make an understanding of speech in a noisy environment easier for someone suffering from hearing loss. Much like the ITC aids, ITE’s are completely wireless and can be connected with smartphones and wireless accessories, which is very beneficial to some.

Like any hearing aid, there are some disadvantages. The ITE shares similar drawbacks to the ITC. One example of this is that this hearing aid is larger and more exposed. The bigger size can put off those who are wanting their hearing aid to be hidden. On top of this, if the canal of the user changes shape, the aid may have to be re-shelled to fit your ear once again.

Does an In the Ear hearing aid sound like a good option for you? At Otec Hearing, we provide you with a free hearing test and give you sound advice about what hearing aid would be best for you, should you need one. Why not give us a call to arrange your consultation on 01522 305400.

In the Canal Hearing Aids

In this blog, we are continuing our series on different types of hearing aids. So far, we’ve covered ‘Invisible in the Ear Canal’ (IIC) and ‘Completely in the Canal’ (CIC) hearing aids. Within this article, we reference these hearing aids and compare them against one another. If you haven’t already, we recommend you read through our blogs on these before this one.

We will be covering ‘In the Canal’ (ITC) hearing aids today, and highlighting both their pros and cons.

In the Canal, aids are larger than CIC hearing aids and are designed to fit the lower half of the external ear. They also require ear impressions to fit your ear, much like CIC and IIC hearing aids. What sets this aid apart from the other aids mentioned, however, is that the ITC aids use a size 312 battery which can last between 7 and 10 days, compared to the 3-5 days that the other two provide. What is also important to note though, is that the faceplate and battery draw of this hearing aid is fully exposed, making it much more visible in comparison to the IIC and CIC options.

Because it is larger, the ITC hearing aids are a handy alternative to the IIC and CIC options for people who may have manual dexterity issues. Its bigger size also means that can house a more powerful receiver, making it an option for those who have severe hearing losses. Also, due to its size, its bigger faceplate and microphones make understanding speech much easier. In the Canal Hearing Aids are completely wireless, and can be connected with smartphones and wireless accessories, which is very beneficial to some.

It does have some drawbacks, however. Its bigger size can put off those who are wanting their hearing aid to be hidden, and if the ear canal of the user changes shape, the aid may have to be re-shelled to fit your ear once again.

Do you think an ITC hearing aid could be suitable for you? At Otec Hearing, we ensure that you are provided with a hearing aid that meets your specific needs. Feel free to get in touch with us for more information.